How to Get Big – 4 Powerful Tips That Deliver!

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Do you want to get big? Are you willing to do what it takes to reach this goal? Are you tired of all the crap articles filled with fluff, tips, hacks, expert advice, overcomplication, and exercises you’ll never, ever try unless all the squat racks and bench stations in a gym are destroyed by a rogue asteroid?

Then read on.

I’m tired of the crap too.

Related: How to Get Massive Arms

Why? I help people change their lives for a living. One of the challenges I face is to help these individuals remove all the noise and nonsense that’s entered their brains during their quest for MONSTER size. People get confused, and with good reason.

Heck, I get confused. I’ve seen hundreds of articles in the last several years alone promising bigger muscle size gains. And guess what? Most of these trainers look like they have pencil necks, 14 inch arms, and weigh a buck 60.

No disrespect meant, but I ain’t that trainer, and I ain’t about that life.

This isn’t an article for 140 pound guys looking to reach 160. This article is for lifters who want the fast train to gainsville, and are willing to do what it takes. This article is for the man who would rather have 17-18 inch arms and 20 to 25% bodyfat, instead of 14 inch arms and 12% body fat.

Strength and size matter. It’s a dog eat dog world. Dangerous. Threatening. Not a place for men that can be blown away by the wind.

So here you are. Ready. Willing. Eager to grow. Here’s how to get big.

Get Massive

How to Get Big – 4 Powerful Tips

Tip #1 – Embrace the Difficult

Trying to find the easy way out? Life, and lifting, doesn’t work that way.

If you choose to take it easy in the gym, and avoid anything super-difficult and challenging, you’ll have a body that matches your work effort. Nothing worth having in life comes easy, and includes building the beefy, muscular body of your dreams.

Om the other hand, if you embrace the difficult, you will have a body that reflects your courage. What is consider “difficult”? Good question.

You can choose to maximize your workouts with the most challenging exercises, or avoid them and opt for easier movements. Choosing the difficult includes performing squats over Smith machine squats, barbell and dumbbell rows first before lat pull downs, heavy overhead press movements instead of all the other wimpy shoulder exercises, and deadlifts. You get the picture.

Run at the mountain, don’t try to run around it. The journey is longer, and less rewarding.

Tip #2 – Make Every Set Count

In my opinion, this is the fastest way to get big. If you make every set count, you make every workout count. If you make every workout count, you maximize your progress.

How is this accomplished? I’ve parroted this advice so many times over the past 10 years that I almost get tired of hearing it.

Push each set for as many reps as possible. Step that set either when you feel like you might fail on the next rep, or when your form starts to slip. Here, you are attacking sets and progressive overload, but safely.

Also, by taking each set deep, you are recruiting a maximal amount of muscle fibers. Again, safely. This is a no-brain recipe for Herculean size and strength.

How many trainees use this simple approach? Not many. Most gym rats prefer to overcomplicate things by replacing hard work and ball-busting effort with magical set-rep schemes, periodization, and percentages.

Tip #3 – Be Freaking Patient

“I have reached a plateau!”

No you haven’t, you’re simply impatient.

Beginner gains come quickly, even if your training is sub-par and your diet isn’t perfect. But after those first six to 12 months, gym life gets tougher. Fact.

Strength gains slow. Muscle gains slow. This isn’t a plateau, it’s the reality of human physiology. You can’t sustain rapid strength and size gains. If you could, we would all be as big and strong as the Hulk after 5 years in the gym.

Your plateau likely isn’t a plateau at all. You are just living in a fantasy world filled with false expectations.

Be. Freaking. Patient.

Take monthly measurements of your arms, legs, chest, calves, forearms, and shoulders. Write down your workouts, including sets, reps, and weight. Monitor change scientifically. Don’t simply remain ignorant of what is actually taking place in the gym or to your body.

“Only” gaining 5 pounds on your bench press every two months isn’t a plateau, that’s good progress. This rate would equate to a 90 pound bench press increase in three years. Gaining “only” 1/2 inch to your arm size in six months isn’t poor progress. That equates to a three inch increase over three years.

Be. Patient. Lifting is a long game that can’t be rushed.

Tip #4 – Stop Thinking So Much

What’s the best training frequency? What’s the best split? What’s the best set and rep scheme? Is Wendler’s 531 OK? Is Starting Strength for me? Are bro splits dead?

On and on and on we go…

Instead of sweating the small stuff, trying mastering the basics. The big stuff. The fundamentals.

Improve your form with heavy, compound movements. Get crazy freaking strong from head to toe. Make every set count. Be patient. Stop missing workouts. Eat enough protein and calories.

Trust the process.

The basics work. Stick to them, get insanely strong over the course of the next three to four years, and watch yourself grow like a weed. You can overthink lifting to death, but no amount of uber-engineering will replace progressive overload on the basics.

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Name: Steve Shaw

Bio: I don’t believe in magic training systems or rep ranges. My philosophy is simple: remain consistent, use the best possible exercises, focus upon progression and enter the gym looking to maximize each set. When you maximize each set, you maximize progress. Easy, obvious, insanely effective.